What to Do If You Relapse

Take this Time to be Honest with Yourself About What Happened

This topic hopefully doesn’t apply to you, but if it does, it’s okay. Please keep reading. Relapse in the first week is incredibly common due to the frequency and severity of withdrawal symptoms. If it happens, we hope you choose to see this as a minor hiccup on the road to abstinence, rather than a defining attribute or a character flaw. This should not prevent you from achieving your ultimate goal.

If you do relapse, take this time to be honest with yourself about what happened. Reflect on what worked and what didn’t. First, think about what went well. What support systems did you have in place? What interventions helped with cravings? What activities did you enjoy and helped you stay busy? Take note of these winning strategies and keep these up.

After this, dig a little deeper and think about what drove you to relapse. When did the decision that resulted in your relapse actually get made? Could the situation have been avoided altogether or did something unexpected pop up? Were the withdrawal symptoms overpowering? Did you reach out for support when you needed? How can you strategize and plan for these occurrences in the future?

Again, if relapse happens, don’t beat yourself up. As the saying goes, relapse is part of recovery. The Guide will be here for you when you’re ready to do it again.

Relapse in the first week is incredibly common due to the frequency and severity of withdrawal symptoms. If it happens, we hope you choose to see this as a minor hiccup on the road to abstinence, rather than a defining attribute or a character flaw.